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Quarterdeck is a free quarterly e-journal-edited by George Jepson-for fans of historical fiction and covering news from McBooks Press and all other publishers, authors, and artists. Click here to see the latest issue, back issues, or to subscribe.




Publishing Schedule

November, 2017
Halfhyde and the Flag Captain, book no.7 The Halfhyde Adventures, by Philip McCutchan

December, 2017
Halfhyde on the Yangtze, book no.8 The Halfhyde Adventures, by Philip McCutchan

A Brief History of Fighting Ships
A Brief History of Fighting Ships Beginning Tuesday, April 25, 2017—

All online orders for five or more books from www.mcbooks.com will receive a free trade paperback copy of David Davies's A Brief History of Fighting Ships: Ships of the Line and Napoleonic Sea Battles 1793–1815. No further action is required. You need not add this book to your shopping cart. Free book and paid books ship separately.


Surveying the turbulent years of the Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815, this masterly chronicle tells the stirring story of the Ship of the Line—the vast, beautiful, and deadly battleships that played a vital role in that titanic conflict. This compact paperback adeptly explains the ships' construction and armaments, the daily life of the men who served, and the problems faced by commanders of the time, in battles that include the Glorious First of June, the Battle of the Nile, and, of course, Trafalgar. Davies provides expert and original analyses of these and the other main sea battles over a 22-year period when mastery over Europe hang in the balance.




"An excellent book…action packed…cleary and simply written. His descriptions of the work of those on gun decks is admirable and leaves no room for regarding life in a battle as anything other than immensely frightening, dangerous and difficult."
—The Nautical Magazine

"[This is] possibly the most useful new book to introduce the reader to the concept of Napoleonic Naval History."
—First Empire

"David Davies' treatment of the Napoleonic Wars considers aspects often given scant attention by many orthodox academic accounts."
—Loyds List



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